Eat My Memoir

Marcel Proust had his madeleine. I have Swiss Steak, Devils on Horseback, 24-Hour Fruit Salad, and other foods particular to my life and times. Please visit my new website dedicated to an autobiography in recipes. I confess to a schizophrenic disposition—one part of my brain devoted to art, the other to food and family.
Click HERE for EatMyMemoir.com

UNDER THE RADAR

A spotlight for members.

Tom Martinelli

Recent Feature

The Monuments Contest: Part Two

The Monuments Contest: Part Two

Compared with the duration of empires past—like those of ancient Rome or Great Britain—the U.S. occupies a relatively tiny span of time, a little more 234 years as the great democratic experiment, if we date the founding of the country to 1776. And so our monuments...

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Recent Feature

A Visit to “Willa”

A Visit to “Willa”

In the high desert of northern New Mexico, sculptor and photographer Paul O'Connor takes in his friend Debbie Long's immersive installation. "Trippy" barely begins to describe the experience. By Paul O'Connor   Several months have passed since my visit to Debbie...

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From the Vasari21 Archives

Ripe for Rediscovery: Francis Picabia

Francis Picabia was a man way ahead of his times. Long before artists of our day became dedicated multitaskers—moving easily from performance to sculpture to video to whatever—Picabia (1879-1953) vigorously avoided any singular style or medium, forging a career that...

Taking Charge

Artists who build careers on their own terms In the last three years, since launching this site, I’ve been struck by the increasing numbers of artists who take the business of showing and marketing their work into their own hands. Though some still nurse fond dreams...

Instagram for Artists

Getting the Most from Your Posts When a friend urged me to start posting on Instagram a few months ago, I immediately balked. I was already uploading a Vasari21 Pic of the Day to Facebook, pinning stuff to Pinterest, sending out weekly bulletins and updates, and...

Cheryl Gross and Marta Wapiennik Choose Each Other

Artistic collaborations are nothing new in the annals of contemporary art—think of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Gilbert and George, or even Tim Rollins and his “at-risk” students, known as the Kids of Survival. But edgy illustrator…

A Sculptor Turns to Urban Farming

In the fall of 2018, Jamie Hamilton went looking for a place to dispose of scraps for compost in Los Angeles, his adopted home since moving from Santa Fe, NM, two years earlier. Through an organization called LA Compost, he discovered the Solano Community Garden in...

A Visit to “Willa”

In the high desert of northern New Mexico, sculptor and photographer Paul O'Connor takes in his friend Debbie Long's immersive installation. "Trippy" barely begins to describe the experience. By Paul O'Connor   Several months have passed since my visit to Debbie...

Me, Myself, and I Part 3

It’s curious to me that more women than men responded to the call for a third round-up of self-portraits on Vasari21. That’s possibly because there are more female members than male (though I can’t tell you the exact ratio), possibly because women traditionally spend...

Ripe for Rediscovery: Berthe Morisot

Having It All in the 19th Century Berthe Morisot’s subjects now seem among the tamest and most ingratiating imaginable: sun-drenched land- and seascapes, women and children casually posed in the garden or cozy domestic interiors, stylish Parisian beauties at their...

Fantasy Curating: Is It Frankenstein?

A make-believe show devoted to "hybrid objects," neither paintings nor sculptures, but definitely here and now By Robert Straight Over a long period of time, there have been artists who haven’t accepted the traditional rectangular format for their paintings....

Ripe for Rediscovery: Lee Lozano

  Several years ago, ARTnews ran a feature called “Ripe for Rediscovery,” polling curators, artists, and critics about which names had been unfairly lost in the shuffle of art history. Some of those who surfaced—Robert Irwin, Giovanni Boldini, and Rafael...

Archived Feature

What Is a Drawing? Part Seven

What Is a Drawing? Part Seven

One evening in the fall of 1940, at the peak of the German blitzkrieg in Britain, Henry Moore took cover during an air raid in the Belsize Park underground station in London. There he encountered dozens of others who had also scurried belowground to seek shelter from...

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Archived Feature

Artists Respond to the Pandemic Part 2

Artists Respond to the Pandemic Part 2

Here we are, now well into the third month of self-isolation, wearing our masks like good citizens if we go out at all, minding the headlines and the barrage of information, and perhaps generally adjusting to a global catastrophe whose true measure will not be known...

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Archived Feature

Grants and Financial Resources for Artists during Covid19

Grants and Financial Resources for Artists during Covid19

I spent about three days scouring available sources (Artnet, The Art Newspaper, the Internet) to see what sorts of funds are available for artists impacted by the Covid19 pandemic. The bad news is how little is out there, and many of the significant grants are only...

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Archived Under the Radar

Gwen Gunter

Gwen Gunter

Among the many adventurous abstract painters who are members of this site, Gwen Gunter has perhaps the most unusual CV. She has worked in public relations, as a sign painter for grocery stores, and as the graphics director for a wholesale radio company and a Big Eight...

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Archived Under the Radar

Mimi Chen Ting

Mimi Chen Ting

Born in Shanghai and raised mostly in Hong Kong, Mimi Chen Ting grew up at a time when traditions were still so strong that her grandmother hobbled around on tiny bound feet and her mother was the concubine of a prosperous banker (her parents married when she was in...

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 Archived Podcast

Alice Robb: Why We Dream

Alice Robb: Why We Dream

In the summer of 2011, science writer Alice Robb discovered a book called Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, which promised readers that they could control the plots of their dreams.

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