Eat My Memoir

A series about family and food

UNDER THE RADAR

A spotlight for members.

Barbara Kemp Cowlin

Recent Feature

Frances Ashforth: Rocks Around the Clock

Frances Ashforth: Rocks Around the Clock

Frances Ashforth’s fascination with water, sky, and undulating landscapes began early. Raised in a family of artists, she spent time as a child at her grandparents’ farm in New Hampshire, along the Connecticut River Valley. She is an avid fly fisherman and in her...

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Recent Feature

The Monuments Contest: And the Winners Are (Part One)

The Monuments Contest: And the Winners Are (Part One)

Everyone is a winner in the competition to replace those tired, toppled memorials In the wake of the murder of George Floyd in May, protesters around the globe tore down monuments to the Confederacy, to slave traders, and to racist baddies of all stripes. I could not...

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From the Vasari21 Archives

The Business of Art Business Coaching, Part One

When you need more than a little help from your friends, seek out a coach I’m not sure when or why I started thinking about the business of art coaching, though I was a guest for one of Paul Klein’s webinars more than a year ago. After I mastered Instagram this...

Ripe for Rediscovery: Francis Picabia

Francis Picabia was a man way ahead of his times. Long before artists of our day became dedicated multitaskers—moving easily from performance to sculpture to video to whatever—Picabia (1879-1953) vigorously avoided any singular style or medium, forging a career that...

How are you? No, I mean, really, how are you?

Artists talk about altered states during the pandemic We are now about seven months into a worldwide catastrophe that has affected nearly every fiber and facet of our being. Many of us have been sheltering in place, limiting our contacts with the outside world,...

Taking Charge

Artists who build careers on their own terms In the last three years, since launching this site, I’ve been struck by the increasing numbers of artists who take the business of showing and marketing their work into their own hands. Though some still nurse fond dreams...

Profile: Vince Aletti

Though short and to the point, the ten or so capsule reviews for art shows in the opening pages of the New Yorker each week are probably among the most widely read in the city, if not the nation.

Art Coaching, Part Two

Doing It One-on-One When I set out to survey the field of art coaching, I had no idea it was such a huge and varied terrain. There are full-service ventures that cover all aspects of building an art career, such as Alyson Stanfield’s  “Art Biz Coach” and Crista...

The Next Step

Landing a show at a small museum or university gallery Let us suppose you’ve been hard-working and fortunate enough to have a slew of gallery shows, group and solo, on your CV. You’ve built up good connections and can perhaps even claim a following of dedicated...

Joan Linder on Miriam Dym

History aside, when I think of an artist whose work I admire and who has had immeasurable impact on my work, I think of Miriam Dym. We met in graduate school nearly two decades ago. She has a particular, and idiosyncratic, vision that engages…

The Studios of Key West

Why Not Consider a Residency in the Tropics? Key West is a town unlike any other in Florida, an island city that marks the southernmost point in the United States. A stone’s throw from Cuba, it’s the end destination of U.S. Route 1, the longest north-south road in the...

What Is a Drawing? Part Three

Far from disappearing from an artist's regular practice, as many critics have complained, the possibilities for drawing have only expanded in the last century, limited only by the imaginations of their creators. Picasso made drawings with a small electric light in a...

Archived Feature

Ripe for Rediscovery: Pat Passlof

Ripe for Rediscovery: Pat Passlof

The last few years have witnessed a surge of interest in the women of Abstract Expressionism, a loosely affiliated group of artists who came of age in the shadow of the male titans of the movement—Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, et...

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Archived Feature

Art Critics in the Time of Covid-19

Art Critics in the Time of Covid-19

What does an art critic do when the museums and galleries are closed? When classes are canceled (if you teach)? When your book spirals into limbo (if you have a publication in the works)? What does the future of art criticism look like as works migrate steadily to...

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Archived Feature

What Is a Drawing? Part Eight

What Is a Drawing? Part Eight

In this, the eighth round-up of drawings from members of the site, I find myself running out of more to say about this oldest means of making an image. And yet even if I fall short on words, the artists never cease to amaze me with new ways to make a drawing....

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Archived Under the Radar

Ilona Pachler

Ilona Pachler

Ilona Pachler Ilona Pachler’s new show at 5. Gallery in Santa Fe, NM, is titled “Zeitbrechung,” a German word meaning “time refraction.” It’s a motley assortment of artworks: 34 crudely modeled clay boats, most on plinths of wood or bricks, cruise the floors of the...

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Archived Under the Radar

Susan Schwalb

Susan Schwalb

It’s a rare artist who finds her medium and her methods early and then sticks with them, with little deviation, for more than four decades. But so it was for Susan Schwalb, who discovered the art of drawing with silverpoint in 1973 and never looked back. She was...

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 Archived Podcast

Alice Robb: Why We Dream

Alice Robb: Why We Dream

In the summer of 2011, science writer Alice Robb discovered a book called Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, which promised readers that they could control the plots of their dreams.

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