Articles

Jane Shoenfeld

After dropping out of the MFA program at Brooklyn College in her twenties, Jane Shoenfeld stopped painting and using color and spent three years drawing her dreams in black and white. Thus began a process that continues some 40 years later of working from what she...

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They Cried. They Gasped. But No One Fainted.

How Critics and Curators Respond to Memorable Works of Art In a recent issue of The New Yorker, actress Allison Janney reported of her first encounter with Wassily Kandinsky’s Black Lines (1913) in the Guggenheim Museum: “I felt an energy go through my chest." I could...

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Critical Reversals

Even the Most Respected Critics Change Their Minds When a politician flip-flops on a position, the public and press alike are quick to cry foul, hurling accusations of bad faith or pandering. But when an art critic changes his or her mind, the ripple effect is likely...

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Deonne Kahler

In the last four years, Deonne Kahler has produced a remarkable series of photographs of the U.S. National Parks system. With an unsentimental but expansive eye, she aims to capture what she calls the “soul and personality” of these wild and often breathtakingly...

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Further Thoughts on Collecting

Some unsolicited advice from a rank amateur I recently read online an excerpt from The Orange Balloon Dog: Bubbles, Turmoil and Avarice in the Contemporary Art Market, the latest book from economist and art market commentator Don Thompson, which will be available in...

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Reinventing Landscape: Part One

The “genre,” if it is such these days, never really goes away Landscape painting enjoys a long and honorable history in art, going as far back as ancient times, when the Greeks and Romans made frescoes of pleasant vistas and enchanting gardens. There have been periods...

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Daisy Patton

Daisy Patton’s cheerfully dysfunctional portraits are bound to remind you of pictures from somebody’s attic, those old crinkle-edged Kodak photos or studio shots that commemorate engagements, high-school graduations, and informal family get-togethers. Yet there are...

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Five Residencies off the Beaten Path: Part One

An artist's residency is a chance to get away from all the crazy distractions of modern life (iGadgets, family, openings, the news) and focus solely on your work. Some find their art growing from the experience, others value the contact with other creative souls, but...

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In Praise of Pop-Ups

How, Why, and Where To Do One In a few weeks, Adria Arch will be staging her second “pop-up art experience” with fellow artists Patti Brady and Catherine Bertulli. The three-day event, called "Appetite," is part of Artweek Boston and will include the usual opening...

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Ed Haddaway

“Even as a kid,” Ed Haddaway remembers,“I was really into making things. My parents would stick us in the back yard and we had hammers and nails and boards. There was a basic primal need to put things together from about the age of five.” Haddaway, a bearded burly man...

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The Biennial Brouhaha

Protests at the Whitney raise questions about race, politics, and bad painting In case you missed it, the big art-world kerfuffle of the week, possibly of the season, happened following the launch of the 2017 Whitney Biennial last week when several artists took...

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Sharon Weiner

Sharon Weiner’s explosive paintings appear to have come into being through random acts of nature—tsunamis, tidal waves, maybe even collisions of meteors in deep space. In reality, the artist fabricates the works by building up several layers of poured acrylic paint...

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Cultivating Your Collectors

It’s mostly a matter of commonsense and good manners. Mom would approve. If you have reached that happy stage of a career where collectors are following your progress, attending shows, and—yes, of course, actually buying work!—you want to cultivate this fan base as...

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Julian Hatton

At the age of 19, Julian Hatton was lucky enough to have one of those life-changing experiences that could be the stuff of movies. Taking time off from his studies at Harvard, he went to visit a friend of his father’s, an abstract artist of some renown named Fernando...

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