Features

Photo credits: bottom of page

Dabbling in Dura-Lar

Your fearless correspondent takes another class It’s always seemed to me that a big part of the fun of art-making lies in the endless amounts of seductive stuff to play with—paints and brushes, pencils and charcoal and pastels, clay and plaster and all kinds of goo,... read more

So You Want To Learn How To Draw?

In which a writer and critic goes back to class Please note that this story is reprinted from the ARTnews issue of October, 1995. But 20 years later, the New York Studio School “drawing marathons” still continue along the same lines, under the expert... read more

What Is a Drawing?

The answer these days is far from simple. The late, great, often cantankerous art critic Robert Hughes more than once bemoaned the apparent decline in standards for draftsmanship.  “In the 45 years that I’ve been writing criticism there has been a tragic depreciation... read more

The Woman Who Lives Inside Bonnard’s World

When painter Leslie Parke was a small child, she would head downstairs early in the morning and open one of her parents’ art books, squatting on the floor and pressing her face into the color reproductions of Fifty Centuries of Art. Her goal was not so much to study... read more

Ripe for Rediscovery: Dorothy Hood

A Major Abstract Artist of the 20th Century Begins To Get Her Due I first stumbled upon the paintings of Dorothy Hood about five years ago, in the home of collector and artist Dora Dillistone. It’s not too much of a stretch to say that I was completely blown away.... read more

Ripe for Rediscovery: Thomas Child

Rare photos from the 1870s give a glimpse into an ancient civilization on the brink of change Her face framed by an ornate tasseled headdress, the bride looks eager and expectant and maybe a little scared. Her groom seems more confident, certainly more relaxed. You... read more

Girl, Unexpectedly Interrupted

In which I try to have a romance with an older man, a real artist. But Mother knows better. During my last semester in college, I worked part time at the university store (fondly known as the “screw store” for its inflated prices on stuff like toothpaste and shampoo).... read more

Art and Meditation

Slowing down, filtering out the noise, and allowing the mind to empty out can offer a tremendous boon to the creative process. Meditation has for years enjoyed a reputation for its restorative powers and its abilities to sharpen the senses (as well as provide deep... read more

The Tie That Binds…Or Not: Part Two

More about relationships between dealers and artists As we pointed out a couple of weeks ago, the connection between an artist and her dealer is often as fraught with difficulties and potential for misunderstandings as even the best of marriages. And as methods and... read more

La Belle Amie Française

How an extraordinary French artist saved ma derrière after I lost my passport in Paris It is almost a decade since my last real vacation (I’m not counting press trips—they can be fun but are generally brief and frenetic, and have lately tapered off along with the... read more

The Tie That Binds….Or Not

What do dealers owe their artists? And what do artists say they aren’t getting? The artist-dealer relationship is one of the most complicated, intimate, and loosely defined of all arrangements between an individual and a business. It can be “like a marriage in its... read more

Ripe for Rediscovery: Francis Picabia

Francis Picabia was a man way ahead of his times. Long before artists of our day became dedicated multitaskers—moving easily from performance to sculpture to video to whatever—Picabia (1879-1953) vigorously avoided any singular style or medium, forging a career that... read more
Share This

Connect with Creative Community! Subscribe to the Vasari21 newsletter.

 

Don't miss out! Sign up to find out which Vasari21 member will be featured each week in Under the Radar. You will also receive info about upcoming podcasts and artist essays.

You have Successfully Subscribed!