Lorna York

Making Waves on the West Coast

Photo credits: bottom of page

Raised in the Midwest, Lorna York moved to Boston in her twenties to pursue a modeling career but soon found herself operating a gallery on tony Newberry Street. That first venture suffered a flood and serious economic challenges, but when she signed on to manage art ventures for Fidelity Investments, she learned some serious lessons in operating a business.

In 2001 she founded Madison Gallery in the coastal town of La Jolla, CA, and now manages a 10,000-square-foot sleek and thriving space dedicated primarily to showing mid-career artists. In our podcast interview, York talks about ways to approach dealers, and if you’ll hang in for the last ten minutes, she has some hard-hitting advice for artists: know what it is you want, have a business plan, and don’t be too needy.

James Austin Murray at work during a Madison "residency"

James Austin Murray at work during a Madison “residency”

 

Donald Martiny at his recent opening

Donald Martiny at his recent opening

 

Donald Martiny and Ann Landi in conversation, late February

Donald Martiny and Ann Landi in conversation, late February

 

A shot of the gallery with Donald Martiny paintings and a sculpture by Jaehyo Lee in the foreground

A shot of the gallery with Donald Martiny paintings and a sculpture by Jaehyo Lee in the foreground

Raised in the Midwest, Lorna York moved to Boston in her twenties to pursue a modeling career but soon found herself operating a gallery on tony Newberry Street. That first venture suffered a flood and serious economic challenges, but when she signed on to manage art ventures for Fidelity Investments, she learned some serious lessons in operating a business.

In 2001 she founded Madison Gallery in the coastal town of La Jolla CA, and now manages a 10,000-square-foot sleek and thriving space dedicated primarily to showing mid-career artists. In our podcast interview, York talks about ways to approach dealers, and if you’ll hang in for the last ten minutes, she has some hard-hitting advice for artists: know what it is you want, have a business plan, and don’t be too needy.

 

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